Statistics

Learn About Megatrends

The orient express

The world economy is shifting from west to east and north to south. This is creating new markets and new sources of competition.

  • Asia is increasingly making a greater contribution to global wealth creation
  • Over a billion people in the Asian region will cross the income threshold to middle class over the coming 20 years
  • Asia is a fast growing market – but it is not an homogenous consumer market
  • Queensland faces new competition with developing countries investing heavily in tourism
  • Emerging economies are expected to experience faster growth in tourist arrivals

A natural advantage

In a world where ecological habitats are disappearing, the unique natural assets of Queensland will become a stronger drawcard.

  • Globally, climate change, poor management and urbanisation will continue to threaten biodiversity
  • Around the world, the ability to connect with nature will become rarer and more expensive
  • Queensland has rare and world heritage natural assets, and the means to preserve them
  • Queensland has world-class natural assets, hosting 85 percent of the nation’s native mammals and five World Heritage natural sites

Great expectations

Tourists of the future will have expectations for authentic and personalised experiences, often involving a personal connection.

  • People’s social media networks are a way for them to make personal connections when they travel
  • Consumers have access to increasing amounts of information in real time
  • Consumers are taking more control and seeking personal interactions

Bolts from the blue

Climate change and infectious disease outbreaks combined with safety concerns will have increased impact.

  • Major events such as extreme weather, terrorism, political unrest, disease outbreaks and financial market fluctuations will continue to impact people’s travel choices
  • We can’t predict when they will occur or where
  • Different events will have positive and negative impacts for a destination, or neighbouring destinations

Digital whispers

People are changing the way they access and trust information in an online world.

  • Like the childhood game of Chinese whispers, as people relate their stories across digital audiences, they can take on a life of their own
  • People are increasing their networks of trusted peers who inform their travel choices
  • An operators’ digital presence and functionality is increasingly important

On the move

Humanity is increasingly mobile. Trade, business, events, education and healthcare are causing more people to travel further and more frequently.

  • People are more mobile, encouraged by low cost airfares and reducing travel times
  • More Australians are travelling overseas
  • It’s about more than just leisure – Sectors like education, business and events are growth travel markets

The lucky country

Australia and Queensland are increasingly wealthy, but expensive destinations gifted with cultural and demographic diversity.

  • The profile of the domestic tourist is changing –working harder, more educated, wealthier, older, and with greater international connections
  • Queensland is a safe and friendly western destination
  • Queensland is an expensive destination in a region of emerging, low cost destinations

The seven megatrends for tourism in Queensland

The CSIRO Futures report identified seven megatrends.

From the convergence of these megatrends, the foresight study identified five defining characteristics Queensland could capitalise on. These characteristics are that Queensland is safe and secure, clean, green, friendly and authentic, and worth it.

Hover over the diagram above for more information on each of the megatrends.

Regions

Regions

Choose a region from the map. You can either click or hover over a region to get information, or select from the legend. Use the Read More button to find out more details.

Tropical North Queensland

Year ending March 2016, the Tropical North Queensland region had attracted:

  • 2,200,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 830,000 international visitors
  • $2.36 billion in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $1.09 billion in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Tropical North QLD region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Townsville

Year ending March 2016, the Townsville region had attracted:

  • 1,166,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 122,000 international visitors
  • $933 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $106 million in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Townsville region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Outback

Year ending March 2016, the Outback region had attracted:

  • 492,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 23,000 international visitors
  • $309 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Outback region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Whitsundays

Year ending March 2016, the Whitsundays region had attracted:

  • 447,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 208,000 international visitors
  • $524 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Whitsundays region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Mackay

Year ending March 2016, the Mackay region had attracted:

  • 803,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 42,000 international visitors
  • $301 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Mackay region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Capricorn

Year ending March 2016, the Southern Great Barrier Reef region (of which Capricorn is a part) had attracted:

  • 1,968,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 140,000 international visitors
  • $948 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure 

For more tourism statistics about the Capricorn region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Gladstone

Year ending March 2016, the Southern Great Barrier Reef region (of which Gladstone is a part) had attracted:

  • 1,968,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 140,000 international visitors
  • $948 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Gladstone region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Bundaberg

Year ending March 2016, the Southern Great Barrier Reef region (of which Bundaberg is a part) had attracted:

  • 1,968,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 140,000 international visitors
  • $948 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Bundaberg region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Southern Queensland Country

Year ending March 2016, the Southern Queensland Country region had attracted:

  • 1,884,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 50,000 international visitors
  • $606 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure  and $73 million in international visitor expenditure 

For more tourism statistics about the Southern QLD country region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Fraser Coast

Year ending March 2016, the Fraser Coast region had attracted:

  • 619,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 131,000 international visitors
  • $286 million in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $36 million in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Fraser Coast region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Sunshine Coast

Year ending March 2016, the Sunshine Coast region had attracted:

  • 3,007,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 258,000 international visitors
  • $1.86 billion in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $236 million in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Sunshine Coast region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Brisbane

Year ending March 2016, the Brisbane region had attracted:

  • 5,696,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 1,150,000 international visitors
  • $3.4 billion in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $1.95 billion in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Brisbane region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.

Gold Coast

Year ending March 2016, the Gold Coast region had attracted:

  • 3,680,000 overnight domestic visitors
  • 949,000 international visitors
  • $2.91 billion in domestic overnight visitor expenditure and $1.22 billion in international visitor expenditure

For more tourism statistics about the Gold Coast region, use the Interactive Chart or download the latest Regional Snapshot published by Tourism and Events Queensland.