Research

Industry has recognised the need to understand their customers better so they can better design and tailor experiences to changing consumer expectations and ensure ongoing relevance in an increasingly competitive industry.

The following research papers were commissioned to help inform discussion and debate at the annual DestinationQ forums.

TripAdvisor Research Project ‘Findings on Queensland from TripAdvisor Data, 2013-2015 (PDF, 6.5MB)’  2016

EC3 Global 'Voice of the Operator Report (PDF, 1.1MB)' 2014

CSIRO 'Megatrends for Queensland tourism' 2013

Colmar Brunton Strategy8 Consulting 'Voice of the Consumer Report (PDF, 10.3MB)' 2014

JLL 'Industry Lifestyle Study (PDF, 859.3KB)' 2014

Duanne Knapp 'Destination Development (PDF, 604.6KB)' 2014

DTESB 'Queensland’s tourism workforce: workforce profile of Qld’s tourism industry' 2014

Insights and projects from Queensland’s tertiary institutions

Queensland’s tertiary institutions have brought a wealth of new thinking to the tourism industry, which will ultimately support our own industry's development; as well as provide inspiration for the next generation of tourism leaders.  The following snapshots give a small glimpse of their work; including their close relationships with industry.

University of Queensland Business School

Strong collaboration is needed for effective tourism disaster recovery

Effective tourism disaster recovery requires strong collaboration across government agencies and between government and tourism industry stakeholders. This research examines tourism stakeholder collaboration in response to Cyclone Marcia, which hit Queensland in 2016. Motives for collaboration were related to resource management and built on previous relationships. Constant communication and trust were key elements for effective collaboration, while competing demands and poor relationships were barriers to effective collaboration.

Jiang, Y. & Ritchie, B.W. (2017). Disaster collaboration in tourism: Motives, impediments and success factors. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 31 70-82.

Festivals have significant positive outcomes for communities

This book identifies the ways in which events and festivals can contribute positively to those communities which host them, beyond traditional economic measures. Social capital, social justice and social inclusion are all areas where the socio-cultural impacts of events can be assessed. However, the book also demonstrates that festivals and events must be planned and managed carefully to avoid potential negative outcomes, such as further exclusion of already marginalised communities.

Mair, J. & Duffy, M. (2017). Festival encounters: Theoretical perspectives. London: Routledge

Meaningful vacation experiences

Increasingly, vacation time is recognised as a quality-of-life experience through which people often define their lives. In this study, 77 participants were asked to reflect on the things that made past vacations meaningful. Many sources of meaning were found to be offered in and through vacations, including strengthening bonds with family and friends, enjoying the hospitality of strangers, spending time in nature, learning new skills, gaining new insights, reflecting on life, engaging in novel or unique experiences, expressing identity, marking milestones, facing and overcoming challenges, establishing a sense of independence and self-sufficiency, and finding inspiration, courage and hope. The findings lend support to the vision of tourism as a positive institution that encourages growth and well-being.

Packer, J. and Gill, C. (2017). Meaningful vacation experiences. In S. Filep, J. Laing, and M. Csikszentmihalyi (Eds) Positive Tourism . (pp19-34) Routledge.

The Impact of Disruptive Technology on Queensland's Tourism

Digital disruption and the collaborative economy is a fact of life for the travel and tourism sector. Mobile technologies have changed the way people research, plan, book and pay for travel, and communication is through smart phones, skype, instant messaging and social media. It has also changed how they think about travel and customer service expectations. The University of Queensland's Tour7040 subject was commissioned to provide recommendations to the Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business, and the Commonwealth Games on tourism policy impacts due to disruptive technologies and the collaborative economy.

Read the report (PDF, 3.6MB)

Griffith University: Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Management and The Griffith Institute for Tourism

Revival of the Charleville Cosmos Centre

The Griffith Institute for Tourism partnered with the Murweh Shire Council to revitalise the Charleville Cosmos Centre in regional Queensland. Based on the core findings of this research the revitalisation is now complete with a virtual rocket and immersive theatre space that opened in April. Watch the time-lapse video of the rocket being constructed.

The Economic Impact of the Commonwealth Games

The Queensland Government and the Office of the Commonwealth Games (OCG) have commissioned Griffith University to deliver an economic modelling study to assess the economic and employment legacy benefits of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games (GC2018). The project utilises a Tourism Computable General Equilibrium (CGE). The GC2018 is an important event that attracts a large number of visitors from overseas and nationally, and it would be expected that the tourism effect will constitute a significant component of the overall economic benefits of the Games. The model has to be seen in the wider context of the Games’ legacy period with a range of tangible and intangible benefits.

Download the public report - The economic impacts of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Global Sustainable Tourism Dashboard

How much does tourism contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals? Researchers from GIFT have collaborated with the University of Surrey to develop a global dashboard to track the performance of tourism across all dimensions of sustainability: economic, social and environmental. The initiative is supported by the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC), World Economic Forum, International Tourism Partnership, and EarthCheck, amongst others. Economic indicators of the number of arrivals, receipts, jobs and investment are collected at a global scale by WTTC and UNWTO amongst others. The Dashboard is now being developed further ton include country and destination monitoring.

Read the Technical Report on how the indicators for the Global Sustainable Tourism Dashboard were conceptualised

Bond University, Department of Hotel and Tourism Management

Sealing the Deal: Factors Influencing Guest Satisfaction with Accommodation Daily Deals

Cox (2017) reports on a recent survey of the consumer experience of accommodation daily deals. Despite their popularity, little research has explored the consumer experience of accommodation ‘daily deals’. The survey reveals a high level of satisfaction with accommodation deals. Five factors influence satisfaction, namely “trade-offs” associated with purchasing deals; their value/integrity; customer delight with the stay; hotel staff’s knowledge of the deal; and redemption challenges.

Read the report - Sealing the Deal: Factors Influencing Guest Satisfaction with Accommodation Daily Deals